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Title:
Funny you should ask : how to make up jokes and riddles with wordplay
Author:
Terban, Marvin.
ISBN / ISSN:
0395605563

0395581133
Personal Author:
Physical Description:
64 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Abstract:
Offers an abundant cache of ideas about using words and wordplay to create engaging riddles and jokes.
Bibliography Note:
Includes bibliographical references (page 64).
Added Author:

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Item Type
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Pasadena Public Library - Main Library Kid/Juvenile Non-fiction Non-fiction Kids book Y 808.7 TERB
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Summary

Summary

Offers an abundant cache of ideas about using words and wordplay to create engaging riddles and jokes.


Summary

An abundant cache of ideas for using words and wordplay to create engaging riddles and jokes.


Author Notes

John O'Brien is a well-known NEW YORKER cartoonist. For Clarion, he has illustrated DEAR OLD DONEGAL Marvin Terban's popular wordplay books for Clarion include IN A PICKLE AND OTHER FUNNY IDIOMS and TO HOT TO HOOT: FUNNY PALINDROME RIDDLES. He lives in New York City.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 4-6. Wordplay, the source of those groaners kids (to say nothing of the rest of us) seem to love so much, is the subject of this neat little book that explains not only how word manipulation works, but also how kids can become school-yard hams. English teacher Terban, an old hand with words works who has a number of books to his credit, introduces four kinds of wordplay--homonyms, "almost-sound-alike words," homographs, and idioms. In a laid-back fashion that won't put off readers, he shows clearly how each type of wordplay works, provides numerous examples to illustrate (explaining each briefly in a follow-up section), and suggests some words to use when making up jokes and riddles of one's own. O'Brien's black-and-white cartoon sketches, liberally scattered throughout, add the perfect visual touch. Great for classroom use and for aspiring comedians--of any age. (Reviewed Oct. 1, 1992)0395605563Stephanie Zvirin


Booklist Review

Gr. 4-6. Wordplay, the source of those groaners kids (to say nothing of the rest of us) seem to love so much, is the subject of this neat little book that explains not only how word manipulation works, but also how kids can become school-yard hams. English teacher Terban, an old hand with words works who has a number of books to his credit, introduces four kinds of wordplay--homonyms, "almost-sound-alike words," homographs, and idioms. In a laid-back fashion that won't put off readers, he shows clearly how each type of wordplay works, provides numerous examples to illustrate (explaining each briefly in a follow-up section), and suggests some words to use when making up jokes and riddles of one's own. O'Brien's black-and-white cartoon sketches, liberally scattered throughout, add the perfect visual touch. Great for classroom use and for aspiring comedians--of any age. ~--Stephanie Zvirin


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-7-- Terban once again demonstrates the power of wordplay. This newest offering spills over with humor based on homonyms, homographs, and idioms, and explains how to create jokes and riddles using the peculiarities of the English language. Youngsters will not only come away with plenty of material to try on their friends, but will also receive pointers on developing their own. In addition to being fun, wordplay calls upon thinking skills and challenges readers in a playful way. The book is divided into chapters according to the linguistic ``trick'' that forms the jokes. A list of the word pairs or idioms used is given at the end of each chapter. O'Brien's comical pen-and-ink illustrations match the text beautifully. Although there are many other fine joke books such as Charles Keller's King Harry the Ape (Pippin, 1989), Louis Phillips's How Do You Lift a Walrus with One Hand? (Viking, 1988), and Fred Gwynne's A Chocolate Moose for Dinner (S. & S., 1988), Terban's is an excellent choice that adds an instructional dimension.-- Renee Steinberg, Fieldstone Middle School, Montvale, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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