Cover image for
Title:
Climbing your family tree : online and offline genealogy for kids : the official Ellis Island handbook
Author(s):
Wolfman, Ira.
ISBN/ISSN:
0761125396
Personal Author:
Physical Description:
xii, 228 pages : illustrations ; 21 x 23 cm
General Note:
Rev. ed. of: Do people grow on family trees? c1991.
Contents:
1 Ancestor Detectors at Work: Tales of Kids and Adults Who Tracked Down Their Families 1 -- 2 Getting Started: The First Steps in Your Family Search 20 -- 3 Let's Talk About ... Us! How to Do Great Family Interviews 44 -- 4 What's Your Name? The History, Mystery, and Meaning of Family Names 60 -- 5 How We Got Here: The Great American Immigration Story, Yesterday and Today 73 -- 6 Becoming an American: Immigrants Make a New Life in a New Land 110.
Bibliography Note:
Includes bibliographical references (pages 212-216) and index.
Geographic Term:
Genre:
Pub Date:
Workman Pub., [2002]

©2002
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Audience
Genre
Home Location
Material Type
Language
Shelf Number
Status
Clayton Library for Genealogical Research Adult Genealogy collection Reference material 929.1 W859 USA
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Bracewell - Houston Public Library Kid/Juvenile Non-fiction Kids book 929.1 W
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Central - Houston Public Library Kid/Juvenile Non-fiction Kids book 929.1 W
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Johnson - Houston Public Library Kid/Juvenile Non-fiction Kids book 929.1 W
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Freed-Montrose -- Houston Public Library Kid/Juvenile Non-fiction Kids book 929.1 W
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Oak Forest - Houston Public Library Kid/Juvenile Non-fiction Kids book 929.1 W
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Stanaker - Houston Public Library Kid/Juvenile Non-fiction Kids book 929.1 W
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Walter - Houston Public Library Kid/Juvenile Non-fiction Kids book 929.1 W
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Walter - Houston Public Library Kid/Juvenile Non-fiction Kids book 929.1 W
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Ring - Houston Public Library Kid/Juvenile Non-fiction Kids book 929.1 W
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Smith - Houston Public Library Kid/Juvenile Non-fiction Kids book 929.1 W
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Heights - Houston Public Library Kid/Juvenile Non-fiction Kids book 929.1 W
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On Order

Summary

Summary

In the ten years since the publication of Do People Grow on Family

Trees? (121,000 copies in print), the Internet has completely transformed genealogy, making family history the second most popular hobby in the U.S. after gardening and genealogy the second most searched for subject on the Web.

Now completely revised, updated, retitled, and filled with detailed guidance on utilizing the Internet, Climbing Your Family Tree is the comprehensive, kid-friendly genealogical primer for the 21st century, and a dramatic story of how and why our ancestors undertook the arduous voyages of immigration to this nation. It teaches kids to track down important family documents, including ships' manifests, naturalization papers, and birth, marriage, and death certificates; create oral histories; make scrapbooks of photos, sayings, and legends; and compile a family tree. A full chapter is devoted to the online search, and relevant Internet information has been incorporated into all the other chapters. Also new are more kids' genealogical stories and a reworked, easier-to-use design, and supporting the book will be a Web site that will include record-keeping pages, links to sites in the book, and more.


Author Notes

Ira Wolfman is a journalist who has been doing genealogical research since 1986. He has traced his family back to 1740s Poland. All four of his grandparents came to America through Ellis Island


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-9-In this revised, updated edition of Do People Grow on Family Trees? (Workman, 1991), Wolfman enthusiastically and thoroughly covers all aspects of genealogy, from forms, heirlooms, interviews, and names to immigration, documents, adoption, and Internet resources. Numerous examples; helpful, amusing sidebars and illustrations; and clear instructions are found throughout the volume. Each of the 11 chapters begins with a summary and ends with a handy "To-Do List." The book even has a companion Web site that includes links to useful URLs, downloadable charts and checklists, tips, quizzes, and games. Unfortunately, the list for further reading relies heavily on old, out-of-print titles, and more up-to-date books are available. Still, Family Tree is the best children's book available on the subject, and will be profitable and inspiring to adults as well.-Ann W. Moore, Schenectady County Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Cyndi HowellsAlex Haley
Forewordp. ix
Introductionp. xi
1 Ancestor Detectors at Work: Tales of Kids and Adults Who Tracked Down Their Familiesp. 1
2 Getting Started: The First Steps in Your Family Searchp. 20
3 Let's Talk About ... Us! How to Do Great Family Interviewsp. 44
4 What's Your Name? The History, Mystery, and Meaning of Family Namesp. 60
5 How We Got Here: The Great American Immigration Story, Yesterday and Todayp. 73
6 Becoming an American: Immigrants Make a New Life in a New Landp. 110

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