Cover image for
Title:
My life, my love, my legacy
Author(s):
King, Coretta Scott, 1927-2006,
ISBN/ISSN:
9781627795982

1627795987
Edition:
First edition.
Physical Description:
viii, 356 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 25 cm.
Contents:
We don't have time to cry -- A sense of belonging -- I have something to offer -- A brave soldier -- Time itself was ready -- The winds of change -- I will never turn back -- Pushed to the breaking point -- I've been called by God, too -- So evil only God could change it -- I have a dream -- Heartbreak knocked, faith answered -- Securing the right to vote was a blood covenant -- Moral concerns know no geographic boundary -- I don't want you to grieve for me -- With a prayer in my heart, I could greet the morning -- My fifth child -- We must learn to disagree without being disagreeable -- Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere -- Happy birthday, Martin -- Our children -- I will count it all joy -- Afterwords / by Andrew Young, Maya Angelou, Patricia Latimore, Congressman John Conyers, Dr. Barbara Williams-Skinner, Myrlie Evers-Williams -- My mother, my mentor / by Dr. Bernice A. King -- The making of her memoir / by Rev. Dr. Barbara Reynolds.
Abstract:
"The life story of Coretta Scott King--wife of Martin Luther King Jr., founder of the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change, and singular twentieth-century American civil rights activist--as told fully for the first time, toward the end of her life, to one of her closest friends. Born in 1927 to daringly enterprising black parents in the Deep South, Coretta Scott had always felt called to a special purpose. One of the first black scholarship students recruited to Antioch College, a committed pacifist, and a civil rights activist, she was an avowed feminist--a graduate student determined to pursue her own career--when she met Martin Luther King Jr., a Baptist minister insistent that his wife stay home with the children. But in love and devoted to shared Christian beliefs and racial justice goals, she married King, and events promptly thrust her into a maelstrom of history throughout which she was a strategic partner, a standard bearer, a marcher, a negotiator, and a crucial fundraiser in support of world-changing achievements. As a widow and single mother of four, while butting heads with the all-male African American leadership of the times, she championed gay rights and AIDS awareness, founded the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change, lobbied for fifteen years to help pass a bill establishing the US national holiday in honor of her slain husband, and was a powerful international presence, serving as a UN ambassador and playing a key role in Nelson Mandela's election. Coretta's is a love story, a family saga, and the memoir of an independent-minded black woman in twentieth-century America, a brave leader who stood committed, proud, forgiving, nonviolent, and hopeful in the face of terrorism and violent hatred every single day of her life."--Provided by publisher.
Added Author:
Pub Date:
Henry Holt and Company, 2017.

©2017
Holds:

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Adult Biography Book B K52
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Named a Best Book of 2017 by NPR
The New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice
The Washington Post 's Books to Read in 2017
USA Today , "New and Noteworthy"
Read it Forward, Favorite Reads of January 2017
A Parade Magazine Pick

"This book is distinctly Coretta 's story . . . particularly absorbing. . . generous, in a manner that is unfashionable in our culture." -- New York Times Book Review

"Eloquent . . . inspirational"-- USA Today

The life story of Coretta Scott King--wife of Martin Luther King Jr., founder of the Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change (The King Center), and singular twentieth-century American civil and human rights activist--as told fully for the first time, toward the end of her life, to Rev. Dr. Barbara Reynolds.

Born in 1927 to daringly enterprising parents in the Deep South, Coretta Scott had always felt called to a special purpose. While enrolled as one of the first black scholarship students recruited to Antioch College, she became politically and socially active and committed to the peace movement. As a graduate student at the New England Conservatory of Music, determined to pursue her own career as a concert singer, she met Martin Luther King Jr., a Baptist minister insistent that his wife stayhome with the children. But in love and devoted to shared Christian beliefs as well as shared racial and economic justice goals, she married Dr. King, and events promptly thrust her into a maelstrom of history throughout which she was a strategic partner, a standard bearer, and so much more.

As a widow and single mother of four, she worked tirelessly to found and develop The King Center as a citadel for world peace, lobbied for fifteen years for the US national holiday in honor of her husband, championed for women's, workers' and gay rights and was a powerful international voice for nonviolence, freedom and human dignity.

Coretta's is a love story, a family saga, and the memoir of an extraordinary black woman in twentieth-century America, a brave leader who, in the face of terrorism and violent hatred, stood committed, proud, forgiving, nonviolent, and hopeful every day of her life.


Author Notes

Writer and civil rights activist Coretta Scott King was born in Heiberger, Alabama, on April 27, 1927. She studied music at Antioch College and the New England Conservatory of Music. She married Martin Luther King, Jr. on June 18, 1953. Coretta Scott King taught and did fundraising for the civil rights movement. When her husband was killed in April, 1968, she took a more active role as a civil rights leader, beginning with her speech on Solidarity Day, June 19, 1968.

King has devoted time to the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change, where she has served as president and chief executive officer. She also established the Coretta Scott King Award in conjunction with the American Library Association to honor outstanding and inspirational contributions by an African American author and an African American illustrator. She published her memoir, My Life with Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1969. She died on January 31, 2006 at the age of 78.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* King and journalist Reynolds met in 1975, forming a firm friendship during which Reynolds interviewed the wife of Martin Luther King Jr. many times. Eventually, their conversations coalesced into a formal agreement for Reynolds to assist the civil rights icon in writing a first-person memoir. The result is wholly focused on King's life and contains intimate thoughts about her childhood, marriage, and professional aspirations. King is remarkably candid as she addresses rumors of her husband's infidelity, her frustrations with the often sexist attitudes of the movement's leaders, and the immense pressure she felt standing at the center of history. King also shares her struggle to balance the needs of her family with her own often overlooked music career. (I love being your wife and the mother of your children, she recounts telling Martin. But if that's all I am to do, I'll go crazy.) King was undoubtedly a singular woman, and readers will be struck by just how strongly her exceedingly compelling story resonates today. She was much more than just the woman behind the man, and now, in the most eloquent of language, she proves that truth once and for all to generations of readers who will embrace her all over again.--Mondor, Colleen Copyright 2016 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Reynolds (Out of Hell and Living Well), an ordained minister who was a confidante of Coretta Scott King (1927-2006) since 1975, has produced from their many conversations together a posthumous memoir largely focused on King's public life. There are few intimate glimpses, although a wife and mother's anxieties come through strongly, as they did in King's 1969 memoir, My Life with Martin Luther King, Jr. The present work includes an array of afterwords (from her daughter Bernice, Maya Angelou, and others) and Reynolds's postscript, "The Making of Her Memoir." It begins by revisiting King's life story and her part in historical events from the Montgomery Bus Boycott to her husband's assassination. The book's latter part traces King's political activism and spiritual commitment since Martin Luther King Jr.'s death, and the roles of their children, Yolanda, Bernice, Martin III, and Dexter, in sustaining his legacy. Overall, though some political disagreements are mentioned, this is a spiritual narrative with God as a frequent directing presence. Readers for whom the Civil Rights Movement is ancient history may get a lot out of Reynolds's rendering of King's account. As oral history, aspects will interest academic historians. "In reading this memoir, I hope somehow you see Coretta," King confides in her introduction. One does, but without the vibrancy, immediacy, and clarity one might hope for. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

Following the 1969 publication of My Life with Martin Luther King, Jr., this autobiography shines a light on the devotion and determination of civil and human rights activist King (1927-2006). As told to close friend Reynolds (Out of Hell & Living Well), King relays her time picking cotton as a child during the Great Depression, her education at Antioch College and the New England Conservatory of Music, her marriage to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and her efforts to create nonviolent social change before and after the death of her husband. This account of family, faith, and activism is most successful in showcasing King's lifelong struggles and is told so genuinely that it leaves the impression of having heard the words directly from the late activist. Memories recounted throughout offer a glimpse into the everyday lives of the King family, from eating dinner together to responding after an attack on their home, providing a complete picture of Coretta's impact. VERDICT Highly recommended for all collections, this may be of particular interest to those attracted to political and social movements as well as those interested in American history.-Mattie Cook, Lake Odessa Community Lib., MI © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.