Cover image for
Title:
The other Einstein : a novel
Author(s):
Benedict, Marie,
ISBN/ISSN:
9781492637257

1492637254
Personal Author:
Physical Description:
296 pages ; 24 cm
Abstract:
The Other Einstein offers us a window into a brilliant, fascinating woman whose light was lost in Einstein's enormous shadow. It is the story of Einstein's wife, a brilliant physicist in her own right, whose contribution to the special theory of relativity is hotly debated and may have been inspired by her own profound and very personal insight. Mitza Maric has always been a little different from other girls. Most twenty-year-olds are wives by now, not studying physics at an elite Zurich university with only male students trying to outdo her clever calculations. But Mitza is smart enough to know that, for her, math is an easier path than marriage. And then fellow student Albert Einstein takes an interest in her, and the world turns sideways. Theirs becomes a partnership of the mind and of the heart, but there might not be room for more than one genius in a marriage.
Pub Date:
Sourcebooks Landmark, [2016]

©2016
Holds:

Available:*

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Central - Houston Public Library Adult Fiction Book BENED
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Central - Houston Public Library Adult Fiction Book BENED
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Stanaker - Houston Public Library Adult Fiction Book BENED
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Meyer - Houston Public Library (Closed for Repair) Adult Fiction Book BENED
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Summary

Summary

One of PopSugar's "25 Books You're Going to Curl Up with this Fall."

"The Other Einsteintakes you into Mileva's heart, mind, and study as she tries to forge a place for herself in a scientific world dominated by men."-Bustle

In the tradition of The Paris WifeandMrs. Poe, The Other Einsteinoffers us a window into a brilliant, fascinating woman whose light was lost in Einstein's enormous shadow. It is the story of Einstein's wife, a brilliant physicist in her own right, whose contribution to the special theory of relativity is hotly debated and may have been inspired by her own profound and very personal insight.

Mitza Maric has always been a little different from other girls. Most twenty-year-olds are wives by now, not studying physics at an elite Zurich university with only male students trying to outdo her clever calculations. But Mitza is smart enough to know that, for her, math is an easier path than marriage. And then fellow student Albert Einstein takes an interest in her, and the world turns sideways. Theirs becomes a partnership of the mind and of the heart, but there might not be room for more than one genius in a marriage.


Author Notes

Marie Benedict is a lawyer with more than ten years' experience as a litigator at two of the country's premier law firms and for Fortune 500 companies.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Benedict's novel, her first, of love, ambition, disappointment, and betrayal begins in 1896 with a young Serbian woman enrolling in the Swiss Federal Polytechnic to study physics. Though possessed of exceptional intellect and talent, Mileva is not easily accepted by her male classmates and professors, except for one outspoken student. Their classroom relationship leads to much more, first sharing music, then mutual scientific theorizing, on to a sexual relationship that yields a child and marriage. The remarkable hook here is that Mileva's love interest is Albert Einstein. The sweetness of the courtship and the bitterness of his betrayal, both scientific the source of the theory of relativity might have been her rather than him and personal, with his unfaithfulness leading to divorce, provide the tension. Benedict insightfully portrays Mileva, Albert, and other European intellectuals of the time and dramatizes the difficulties a woman faced when attempting to enter that world. She also vividly captures the atmosphere, the cafes, the boardinghouse, and the customs of Mileva's world, making for an engaging and thought-provoking fictional telling of the poignant story of an overshadowed woman scientist.--Hoover, Danise Copyright 2016 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Albert Einstein may not have been the only mastermind behind his groundbreaking ideas about relativity; it turns out the renowned theoretical physicist collaborated a great deal with his first wife, Mileva Maric'-a Serbian woman of modest means who was one of the few women to study math and science at the Zurich Polytechnic School where the two meet. In her compelling novel, Benedict shows how Mileva transforms from a sheltered girl into a personally and professionally fulfilled young woman as she meets other educated women like her in the Swiss boarding house near her school and, through her new acquaintance Albert Einstein, engages in theoretical discussions with male colleagues during which her intelligence is both admired and supported. But Albert and Mileva are a product of their times; the turn of the century wasn't exactly a liberating time for women, and the self-centered Albert has no compunctions about deleting her name from papers they assiduously work on together. Their tenuous personal life (including a child he ignores), his affairs, and his insistence that his wife be more possession than spouse causes the marriage to implode. Did giving Mileva his Nobel Prize earnings assuage his guilt for her unacknowledged assistance and confirm her contribution to his work? Benedict makes a strong case that the brilliant woman behind him was integral to his success, and creates a rich historical portrait in the process. Agent: Laura Dail, Laura Dail Literary Agency. (Oct.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

To what extent did Albert -Einstein's first wife, Mileva Maric', contribute to his groundbreaking theories? That question lies at the heart of this first novel, narrated by Mileva. When she arrives from Zagreb to study physics in Zurich in 1896, she faces local prejudice against Serbs and pity for her limp resulting from a congenital defect. She also must prove herself academically in a class of five men, including -Albert; his interest in her quickly shifts from intellectual to romantic, with promises of marriage he doesn't fulfill until after their daughter, Lieserl, is born. Having lost her academic chances, Mileva hopes to continue collaborating with Albert on his theories, but he never acknowledges Mileva's work and increasingly treats her like a servant. Benedict draws on many sources, especially letters from Albert, Mileva, and her friend Helene Kaufler, but Albert in this portrait emerges as self-centered, unlikable, and ambitious. And as Mileva submits to Albert's repeated bullying, it is hard to imagine her drive and determination in pre-Zurich days. Although both Lieserl's fate (early death or possible adoption) and Mileva's scientific contributions are subjects of debate, they continue to stimulate discussion. VERDICT With a reading group guide included and major publicity campaign planned, expect steady demand in public libraries. [See Prepub Alert, 5/2/16.]-Kathy Piehl, Minnesota State Univ. Lib., Mankato © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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