Cover image for
Title:
The stranger
Author(s):
Camus, Albert, 1913-1960.
ISBN/ISSN:
0679420266

9780679420262
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Étranger. English
Physical Description:
xxxv, 117 pages ; 22 cm.
Series:
Everyman's library ; 139

Everyman's library (Alfred A. Knopf, Inc.) ; 139.
Contents:
Introduction -- Select bibliography -- Chronology -- Translator's note -- Stranger: -- Part 1 -- Part 2.
Abstract:
When a young Algerian named Meursault kills a man, his subsequent imprisonment and trial are puzzling and absurd. The apparently amoral Meursault--who puts little stock in ideas like love and God--seems to be on trial less for his murderous actions, and more for what the authorities believe is his deficient character.
Reading Level:
880 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 6.8 6.0 5997.
Bibliography Note:
Includes bibliographical references (page xxviii-xxix).
Lexile Number:
880 Lexile.
Subject Term:
Geographic Term:
Pub Date:
Knopf : Distributed by Random House, 1993.

©1993
Holds:

Available:*

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On Order

Summary

Summary

(Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)

Albert Camus's spare, laconic masterpiece about a Frenchman who murders an Arab in Algeria is famous for having diagnosed, with a clarity almost scientific, that condition of reckless alienation and spiritual exhaustion that characterized so much of twentieth-century life.

Possessing both the force of a parable and the excitement of a perfectly executed thriller, The Stranger is the work of one of the most engaged and intellectually alert writers of the past century.

Translated by Matthew Ward


Author Notes

Born in 1913 in Algeria, Albert Camus was a French novelist, dramatist, and essayist. He was deeply affected by the plight of the French during the Nazi occupation of World War II, who were subject to the military's arbitrary whims. He explored the existential human condition in such works as L'Etranger (The Outsider, 1942) and Le Mythe de Sisyphe (The Myth of Sisyphus, 1942), which propagated the philosophical notion of the "absurd" that was being given dramatic expression by other Theatre of the Absurd dramatists of the 1950s and 1960s.

Camus also wrote a number of plays, including Caligula (1944). Much of his work was translated into English. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1957.

Camus died in an automobile accident in 1960.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

The new translation of Camus's classic is a cultural event; the translation of Cocteau's diary is a literary event. Both translations are superb, but Ward's will affect a naturalized narrative, while Browner's will strengthen Cocteau's reemerging critical standing. Since 1946 untold thousands of American students have read a broadly interpretative, albeit beautifully crafted British Stranger . Such readers have closed Part I on ``door of undoing'' and Part II on ``howls of execration.'' Now with the domestications pruned away from the text, students will be as close to the original as another language will allow: ``door of unhappiness'' and ``cries of hate.'' Browner has no need to ``write-over'' another translation. With Cocteau's reputation chiefly as a cineaste until recently, he has been read in French or not at all. Further, the essay puts a translator under less pressure to normalize for readers' expectations. Both translations show the current trend to stay closer to the original. Marilyn Gaddis Rose, SUNY at Binghamton (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

I

p. 1

Part One

p. 1

II

p. 22

III

p. 30

IV

p. 42

V

p. 50

VI

p. 59

Part Two

p. 77

I

p. 77

II

p. 89

III

p. 102

IV

p. 123

V

p. 135